Access a range of climate-related reports issued by government agencies and scientific organizations. Browse the reports listed below, or filter by scope, content, or focus in the boxes above. To expand your results, click the Clear Filters link.

Screenshot of PR State of the Climate report cover image
Published
September 2022

Published by the Puerto Rico Climate Change Council, this report presents the social and ecological vulnerabilities amid changing climate conditions in Puerto Rico from 2014-2021. Each of the four working groups provide an assessment of:

  • Geophysical and Chemical Scientific Knowledge
  • Ecology and Biodiversity
  • Society and Economy
  • Communications and Outreach
An image of a wildfire in contrast to a still, snowy landscape
Published
August 2022

An international, peer-reviewed publication released each summer, the State of the Climate is the authoritative annual summary of the global climate published as a supplement to the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society. The report, compiled by NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Information, is based on contributions from scientists from around the world. It provides a detailed update on global climate indicators, notable weather events, and other data collected by environmental monitoring stations and instruments located on land, water, ice, and in space.

Drought and Infrastructure report cover
Published
June 2022

This Drought Guide, developed through the interagency National Drought Resilience Partnership, can be used to anticipate and prepare for the consequences of drought on infrastructure services. This resource directs users to the National Integrated Drought Information System (drought.gov) and other agencies’ information and decision tools.

2021 Arctic Report Card
Published
June 2022

As the influences of human-caused global warming continue to intensify, with the Arctic warming significantly faster than the globe overall, the 2021 Arctic Report Card (ARC2021) brings a broad view of the state of the Arctic climate and environment. The ARC2021 provides an update on seven Arctic Vital Signs, from sea ice to snow and air temperatures to tundra greenness, and checks in on three Indicator topics for updates on river discharge, ocean acidification, and observations of substantial Arctic beaver expansion. The noteworthy emerging topics in the four ARC2021 Frostbites—marine debris, marine noise, food access during the COVID-19 pandemic, and glacier and permafrost hazards—share a common link as they look at the impacts of more people and human activity in the Arctic as well as the challenges and hazards people face with the rapidly changing cryosphere. The scientific and observational story of the Arctic is a human story—of climate change, of increased shipping and industrial activity, and of communities responding to local and regional disruptions.

Montage of nature images
Published
June 2022

To become climate resilient requires collective action. Our efforts must take a Whole-of-Government and Whole Community approach.

The Resilient Nation Partnership Network is working to address this through partnership. The result of our collective action is this Building Alliances for Climate Action resource. It is the work of many organizations and individuals, including federal representatives, faith leaders, community-based organizations, mayors and many more. At a time when many are searching for direction on how to address the climate crisis, this resource represents a unifying voice, helping guide the Whole Community forward

Report cover
Published
April 2022

Heat is the number one weather-related killer in the United States. As average global temperatures continue to rise, the threats of both extreme heat events and chronic heat are projected to increase.

Heat disproportionately affects marginalized residents and those who face systematic inequities such as workplace safety, housing quality, energy affordability, transportation reliability, and healthcare access. But planning can shape heat risk. Planners will be key practitioners in helping their communities achieve greater heat resiliency by proactively managing and mitigating heat across the many systems and sectors it affects.

PAS Report 600 provides holistic guidance to help practitioners increase urban heat resilience equitably in the communities they serve. It provides an in-depth overview of the contributors to urban heat and equity implications, and it lays out an urban heat resilience framework and collection of strategies to help planners mitigate and manage heat across a variety of plans, policies, and actions.

Published
February 2022

The Working Group II contribution to the IPCC Sixth Assessment Report assesses the impacts of climate change, looking at ecosystems, biodiversity, and human communities at global and regional levels. It also reviews vulnerabilities and the capacities and limits of the natural world and human societies to adapt to climate change.

Published
February 2022

The Sea Level Rise Technical Report provides the most up-to-date sea level rise projections available for all U.S. states and territories; decision-makers will look to it for information.

This multi-agency effort, representing the first update since 2017, offers projections out to the year 2150 and information to help communities assess potential changes in average tide heights and height-specific threshold frequencies as they strive to adapt to sea level rise.

FY22 edition of the US Global Change Research Program's annual "Our Changing Planet" report
Published
February 2022

This is the FY22 edition of the U.S. Gllobal Change Research Program's annual report to Congress mandated by the the Global Change Research Act. The report provides an overview of the Program’s progress in delivering on its strategic goals as well as a summary of agency expenditures under USGCRP’s budget crosscut.

report cover
Published
January 2022

The Fiscal Year 2022 edition of the U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP’) annual report to Congress, Our Changing Planet, presents recent Program accomplishments that illustrate how USGCRP is meeting its mandate under the GCRA and achieving the goals outlined in the Program’s 2012–2021 Strategic Plan and its 2017 update. Highlighted activities represent interagency collaborations undertaken in calendar year 2020 that rely on coordinated investments of two or more member agencies and contribute to implementing USGCRP’s strategic goals.

Screenshot of the website homepage for the State Climate Summaries
Published
January 2022

The State Climate Summaries provided here were initially produced to meet the demand for state-level climate information in the wake of the Third U.S. National Climate Assessment. This 2022 version provides new information and extends the historical climate record to 2020 for each state. The summaries cover assessment topics directly related to NOAA’s mission, specifically historical climate variations and trends, future climate model projections of climate conditions during the 21st century, and past and future conditions of sea level and coastal flooding. Additional background information and links are given below.

Report Cover of the December 2021 EPA Seasonality and Climate Change Report
Published
December 2021

This Environmental Protection Agency report discusses how climate change affects the timing and nature of seasonal events, summarizes changes that have been observed in the United States, and describes the implications of these changes. The main report discusses the science behind seasonal events and the ways in which climate change can influence seasonal trends. It uses many years of observations from EPA’s climate change indicators to explore the interconnectedness of seasonal changes. The technical appendix describes EPA's evaluation approach and criteria for selecting indicators, and it also provides documentation of sources and methods for the indicators featured in this report. 

Report cover with words: Initial Vermont Climate Action Plan
Published
December 2021

The Vermont Climate Action Plan aims to dramatically reduce greenhouse gas emissions, help protect Vermont communities and landscapes from the greatest risks of climate change, and create new clean energy industry and jobs. The Climate Action Plan includes strategies to:

  1. Reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation, building, regulated utility, industrial, commercial, and agricultural sectors;
  2. Encourage smart growth and related strategies;
  3. Achieve long-term sequestration and storage of carbon and promote best management practices to achieve climate mitigation, adaption, and resilience on natural working lands;
  4. Achieve net zero emissions by 2050 across all sectors;
  5. Reduce energy burdens for rural and marginalized communities;
  6. Limit the use of chemicals, substances, or products that contribute to climate change; and
  7. Build and encourage climate adaptation and resilience of Vermont communities and natural systems.

The Climate Action Plan serves as a guide for the Vermont Legislature in setting policy that supports climate change solutions for Vermonters and Vermont's landscape. 

A range of resources documenting report preparation are available in the Climate Action Plan Appendices.

Cover of the From Farm to Kitchen: The Environmental Impacts of U.S. Food Waste report
Published
November 2021

EPA prepared the report, From Farm to Kitchen: The Environmental Impacts of U.S. Food Waste, to inform domestic policymakers, researchers, and the public about the environmental footprint of food loss and waste in the U.S. and the environmental benefits that can be achieved by reducing U.S. food loss and waste. It focuses primarily on five inputs to the U.S. cradle-to-consumer food supply chain -- agricultural land use, water use, application of pesticides and fertilizers, and energy use -- plus one environmental impact -- green house gas emissions. 

This report provides estimates of the environmental footprint of current levels of food loss and waste to assist stakeholders in clearly communicating the significance; decision-making among competing environmental priorities; and designing tailored reduction strategies that maximize environmental benefits. The report also identifies key knowledge gaps where new research could improve our understanding of U.S. food loss and waste and help shape successful strategies to reduce its environmental impact.

Screen capture of Report cover
Published
October 2021

Every day, Americans make decisions that are relevant to their current and future resilience to climate change. How much water will their crops or livestock need this year? How high should a bridge be built
to withstand future flooding? Where can they purchase a home without worrying about the risks of wildfire or storm surge?

Having access to useful climate services will enable individuals, governments, business, and organizations to make decisions based on sound science. Advancing the development, communication, and accessibility of climate services will require a whole-of-government approach, with increased collaborations between science providers and agencies who work closely with communities. And addressing climate-related challenges, such as those associated with drought, wildfire, flooding, coastal resilience, and extreme heat can provide timely opportunities for engagement and progress.

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Published
October 2021

Executive Order 14008, “Tackling the Climate Crisis at Home and Abroad,” calls for the development of two companion reports. This, the second of the two reports, discusses the potential development of a consolidated Federal geographic mapping service that can facilitate public access to climate-related information to assist Federal, State, local, and Tribal governments in their local, national, and international climate planning and resilience activities. This report uses the term “collaborative” mapping service instead of “consolidated” mapping service to better reflect the integrated roles and participation of Federal agencies and non-Federal constituents in providing climate-related and other geospatial data and services.

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Published
September 2021

Climate change affects all Americans—regardless of socioeconomic status—and many impacts are projected to worsen. But individuals will not equally experience these changes. This report  improves our understanding of the degree to which four socially vulnerable populations—defined based on income, educational attainment, race and ethnicity, and age—may be more exposed to the highest impacts of climate change. Understanding the comparative risks to vulnerable populations is critical for developing effective and equitable strategies for responding to climate change.

Screen capture of Report cover
Published
September 2021

For the six states of the U.S. Southwest (Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, and Utah)i , January 2020 through August 2021 have been exceptional in the instrumental climate record since 1895, with the lowest total precipitation and the third-highest daily average temperatures recorded, which together imposed an unyielding, unprecedented, and costly drought. This exceptional drought punctuates a two-decade period of persistently warm and dry conditions throughout the region. 

Deep sea divers in SCUBA gear float around a large underwater marine reef surrounded by a sea of teal and blue water.
Published
August 2021

Executive Order 14008, Tackling the Climate Crisis at Home and Abroad, requires that each Federal agency develop a Climate Action Plan for Adaptation and Resilience. This plan highlights the important role the Department of Commerce plays in advancing climate adaptation and resilience. The actions captured in this Plan, as well as the broader work of the Department to address the climate crisis, support the Department’s mission to create the conditions for economic growth and opportunity.

Sections in this report include:
  • Why Is Climate Adaptation & Resilience Planning Important for the Department of Commerce?
  • Efforts to Enhance Climate Literacy into the Management Workforce
  • Climate Vulnerability Assessment
  • Actions to Enhance Climate Adaptation and Resilience with Climate-Ready Sites and Facilities 
  • Actions to Enhance Climate Adaptation and Resilience with Climate-Ready Products and Services
  • Priority Climate Adaptation and Resilience Actions
Report cover
Published
August 2021

This Working Group I contribution to the Sixth Assessment Report addresses the most up-to-date physical understanding of the climate system and climate change, bringing together the latest advances in climate science and combining multiple lines of evidence from paleoclimate, observations, process understanding, and global and regional climate simulations. The website for the report includes a Summary for Policymakers, a Technical Summary, an Interactive Atlas, a Frequently Asked Quetions (FAQs), Regional Fact Sheets, Data Access, Outreach Materials, and Errata.

Screenshot of the Leading Practices in Climate Adaptation report.
Published
July 2021

This collection of leading practices in climate adaptation covers a suite of climate adaptation actions and is intended to broadly promote collaborative learning. Each practice in the collection is explained and supported by concrete examples. These practices are drawn from WUCA work products and WUCA members' experiences, and, when possible, connected to relevant resources and related efforts. Most of these practices are appropriate for water utilities of any size, as well as other sectors interested in climate adaptation.

The current practices and where they are placed within the five essential climate adaptation action areas:

  • Engage
  • Understand
  • Plan
  • Implement
  • Sustain

It is important to note that these action areas and leading practices are not prioritized. Instead, the most useful practices depend on the individual organization's needs and priorities.

Published
July 2021

A Coastal Resilience Center research team, led by Dr. Cassandra R. Davis of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, has released a report that explores the disproportionate impacts of federal mitigation assistance on socially marginalized groups and under-resourced neighborhoods. The purpose of the report is to improve mitigation efforts by addressing equity in emergency management, ultimately supporting the creation of national policy for federal agencies including FEMA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and others.

Report Cover
Published
June 2021

This resource guide for rural communities identifies resources that develop the recreation economy. Growing and maintaining a healthy recreation sector that benefits residents over the long term requires balancing natural resource management, conservation efforts, infrastructure investment, business development, and many other factors. It also requires active stakeholder engagement, a robust understanding of potential challenges and opportunities, collaboration among various levels of government and landowners, and a strong plan for the region’s future. These efforts present unparalleled economic opportunities—to revitalize main street, preserve cultural heritage, support entrepreneurship and small business growth, reinvest in communities and more.

Report Cover
Published
June 2021

Over the course of January to March 2021, Climate XChange and Fairmount-Indigo CDC Collaborative engaged in conversations with frontline community leaders across Massachusetts. These discussions sought to understand the challenges they see in their communities, comprehend their long-term vision for solutions, gather their priorities for how investments should be spent, and identify ways to make the benefits of investments accessible to all. The researchers talked with individuals from organizations working in communities of color and low-income communities, labor unions, women-led organizations, local colleges, and organizations representing communities affected by sea level rise. This report presents key recommendations that represent the qualities and values that every investment package moving forward should exhibit. 

cover of report
Published
June 2021

Climate change is expected to disrupt many aspects of life in American Sāmoa. Those who are already vulnerable—including children, the elderly, low-income families, and individuals with disabilities—are at greater risk from extreme weather and climate events. This report provides guidance for decision makers seeking to better understand the implications of climate variability and change for American Sāmoa and its communities and identifies the additional information and research needed to support responses that enhance resilience and help American Sāmoa to withstand the changes to come. This is one of a series of PIRCA reports aimed at assessing the state of knowledge about climate change indicators, impacts, and adaptive capacity of the U.S.-Affiliated Pacific Islands and the Hawaiian archipelago. Authors from the University of Hawai‘i and the East-West Center—along with 25 technical contributors from local governments, NGOs, researchers, and community groups—collaboratively developed the American Sāmoa report.

Report Cover
Published
May 2021

This review examines the peer-reviewed literature on community resilience interventions and metrics that may apply to the Northeastern region of the United States. The overarching goal is to inform local public health practitioners and planners about the availability of evidence-based strategies to strengthen and measure community resilience to climate change-related disasters. It discusses five selected strategies, their applicability at a local public health level, and the metrics used to measure the extent to which community resilience had been strengthened.

Cover of report
Published
May 2021

The central recommendation of this report, submitted to the National Climate Task Force, is that the pursuit of a decade-long national conservation effort be faithful to eight core principles. These principles—which include a commitment to collaboration, support for voluntary and locally led conservation, and honoring of Tribal sovereignty and private property rights—are essential ingredients to building and maintaining broad support, enthusiasm, and trust for this effort. These principles are also indispensable to achieving durable outcomes that meaningfully improve the lives of Americans.

Report cover
Published
April 2021

This report presents key findings from evaluative research investigating the Pacific Islands Climate Change Cooperative's (PICCC) achievements in the Hawaiian Islands between 2009 and 2018. Based on interviews and a survey, the report describes the foundational conditions from which the PICCC set out to establish a landscape conservation framework, the challenges it faced, its goals and achievements, and transferable lessons from the experience for any conservation community working with limited resources across large expanses of land and ocean. 

Published
April 2021

Planning for a Changing Climate guides NPS planners and managers in developing robust climate change adaptation strategies to better protect park resources and assets today and for future generations. The guide derives from Climate-Smart Conservation, the product of an interagency and nongovernmental organization partnership led by the National Wildlife Federation (NWF). Planning for a Changing Climate incorporates scenario planning concepts in the climate-smart framework to advance adaptation planning in the National Park Service

Report cover
Published
April 2021

In 2020, New York City's Mayor’s Office of Resiliency initiated an engagement process, called the Climate Knowledge Exchange, to align research with climate resiliency and adaptation needs. This report is the first in an annual series that will maintain a public agenda for climate research in NYC. The report communicates NYC’s research needs to external partners, including academic scientists, federal researchers, philanthropic foundations, and community organizations. This in turn will catalyze new and creative partnerships to develop credible and actionable research products that address NYC’s most pressing climate challenges. The report includes the engagement methodology and survey text used with various agencies.

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Published
March 2021

This Guide is written for practitioners already using or wanting to use future climate information in their work, but who are not familiar with the underlying assumptions and choices surrounding climate data. Here, we introduce the climate model scenarios that are used to “drive” climate models forward in time. These scenarios are a combination of socioeconomic and climate forcing pathways. We summarize differences between these scenarios for the Great Lakes region to show users how their choice of model scenario affects future temperature and precipitation projections.

Cover of report
Published
February 2021

The world is transforming its energy system from one dominated by fossil fuel combustion to one with net-zero emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2), the primary anthropogenic greenhouse gas. This energy transition is critical to mitigating climate change, protecting human health, and revitalizing the U.S. economy. To help policymakers, businesses, communities, and the public better understand what a net-zero transition would mean for the United States, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine convened a committee of experts to investigate how the U.S. could best decarbonize its transportation, electricity, buildings, and industrial sectors.

This report, Accelerating Decarbonization of the United States Energy System, identifies key technological and socio-economic goals that must be achieved to put the United States on the path to reach net-zero carbon emissions by 2050. The report presents a policy blueprint outlining critical near-term actions for the first decade (2021-2030) of this 30-year effort, including ways to support communities that will be most impacted by the transition.

Published
February 2021

This report's subtitle is Managing the Uncertainty of Future Sea Level Change and Extreme Water Levels for Department of Defence Coastal Sites Worldwide.

From the Executive Summary: Global change, including climate change, poses unique challenges to the Department of Defense (DoD). In particular, coastal military sites, and their associated natural and built infrastructure, operations, and readiness capabilities, are vulnerable to the impacts of rising global sea level and local extreme water level (EWL) events. This report and its accompanying scenario database provide regionalized sea level and EWL scenarios for three future time horizons (2035, 2065, and 2100) for 1,774 DoD sites worldwide. The global nature of DoD’s presence required a broad and comprehensive approach that to this point has been lacking in similar efforts.

Report Cover
Published
February 2021

This report aims to build the capacity of organizations to serve as catalysts in supporting members of their communities stepping into leadership roles, as well as engaging them meaningfully in defining the scope of local climate change risks and impacts and formulating and implementing equitable solutions alongside key partners. This guide was developed using qualitative data collected through a series of interviews with experts from around the country who are designing, managing, and implementing community-based leadership development programs. Although not all of these programs directly address climate change and environmental justice, this collection of diverse programming illustrates the broad ways in which communities address leadership development and grassroots engagement in local decision making. This tool provides a comprehensive picture of training and capacity-building theory and practice, and showcases programs that are diverse in content, audience, geography, outcome, and practice.

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Published
February 2021

Electric power is essential for the lives and livelihoods of all Americans, and the need for electricity that is safe, clean, affordable, and reliable will only grow in the decades to come. At the request of Congress and the Department of Energy, a committee of experts convened to undertake a comprehensive evaluation of the U.S. grid and how it might evolve in response to advances in new energy technologies, changes in demand, and future innovation. This book presents an extensive set of policy and funding recommendations aimed at modernizing the U.S. electric system, addressing technology development, operations, grid architectures, and business practices, as well as ways to make the electricity system safe, secure, sustainable, equitable, and resilient.

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Published
February 2021

Created especially for decision makers and adaptation planners in the Great Lakes region, this report offers planners guidance in developing adaptation plans while navigating local politics and specialized data. Content is accessible for users of all skill levels, with a focus on beginner. The report is divided into six main sections: Climate Change in the Great Lakes Region, Decision Making Under Uncertainty, Climate Information in the Local Planning Process, Data Analysis Guide for Assessing Climate Vulnerability, Building Climate Knowledge and Capacity, and Making the Case. 

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